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Switch-Pitchers

by Norman German

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ISBN 978-1-60452-040-8

Softback, 274 pp

$16.95 USD plus shipping and handling

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Switch-Pitchers

 

“The first time I saw him throw, a lump of sadness grew in my throat like a water-filled balloon. In two throws, I knew he was two players—the fastest pitcher who had ever lived and the fastest pitcher who would ever live.”

The next best thing to playing baseball is reading sure-handed writing about it, and Norman German has the sure hands of a shortstop. In Switch-Pitchers, he gets the history right, the texture of the game feels real, and the ending is a Major-League tearjerker!  Mike Fontenot —Chicago Cubs second baseman

The beauty of baseball goes beyond stats. It’s the perfect metaphor for life with its ebbs and flows, its battles between good and evil, haves and have-nots. Switch-Pitchers captures that and more, combining the intricacies of the sport with mid-20th century period details. From farce to epiphany, German delivers a full nine innings in this one.  Jack B. Bedell —Columnist, TheScore.com

Switch-Pitchers transports readers to the world of minor-league baseball in the 1950s, a terrain of epic struggle. Set in the fecund soil of Louisiana, German’s novel resurrects Ernest Hemingway, Havana ballplayers, and the thrilling story of America’s pastime in a bygone era.  Dayne Sherman —Welcome to the Fallen Paradise

The 1952 Lake Charles Lunkers are entrenched in fourth place in the Gulf Coast League when left- and right-handed Cuban pitchers—twins smuggled to Key West by Ernest Hemingway—arrive in May.

Trying to arbitrate between the twins, who have a Major-League sibling rivalry, is Bobby, a quiet southpaw with a tragic past.  In the last game of the season, his arm in excruciating pain, Bobby sees something in the grandstands that alters the course of the game, the season, and his life.

From the comic opening to Bobby’s shocking resolution to his problems, readers will be laughing and crying at this realistic portrayal of racial tension and healing during the Jackie Robinson era in baseball.